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20130115
20130123
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
that investigates life inside the controversial religion. that's our all-new "rock center," tonight at 10:00, 9:00 central. i'm brian williams. we sure hope to have you back here tomorrow evening. good night.
in the distinction between race and religion and etc. so by giving it a name and it's starting to have its own life. i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934, roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. the president would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and it was called the state of the union. a lot of these terms were sort of created by presidents -- we think they are from day one. in fact, they are ones that have been added later. and again, some of them are just wonderful. just jumping to a couple, zachary taylor created the term first lady. he applied it to dolly madison but it was the first that anyone had ever used that term. the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was jumping around a little bit and woodrow wilson had potomac fever, which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson, watchful waiting was very appropriate. first with his relationship with dictatorship in mexico, feeling that we should go in and intervene wilson said no, this is watch and wait. once the war started, world war i, that was
religion. tonight at 10:00, 9:00 central. i'm brian williams. we sure hope to have you back here tomorrow evening. good night.
and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to speak to, as you see
it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to
, paul haggis, says he thinks the religion is a cult. the church says haggis has not been an active member in years and dismisses him as "the hypocrite of hollywood." we will hear from paul haggis and talk to the author of a new book that explores the ties between scientology and hollywood. but we are going to begin with breaking news what could be dramatic developments in that hostage situation involving americans in algeria. nbc's michelle kosinski has the latest for us in london. michelle, good morning to you. >> reporter: hi, savannah. this is changing by the minute. the latest from the associated press, quoting an algerian official, is that at least 20 of these hostages have now been able to escape, including americans. the al qaeda-linked militant group that has claimed responsibility for this say they have been holding 41 hostages, among them, we know americans, british, norwegians, japanese and they claim that this is retaliation for french intervention in neighboring mali against islamic militants there. at this hour, scattered reports out of the algerian desert that this l
, is becoming a bit of a religion for me. >> is it? >> stephanie: yeah when somebody says let's do -- and suggests some sub stand -- i'm like what? go to meeting it is so much better. why are you going anywhere else? i don't understand. it's the fast and simple way to meet with clients and coworkers online. >> and to attend a meeting, you don't even even have to be sitting at your desk. >> stephanie: yes, you can see and collaborate on the same documents at the same time. >> right. you can be in your jammys on your bed. >> stephanie: right. in my sushi pajamas or dog pajamas. >> right. >> stephanie: i can be traveling, doing -- on the road doing sexy liberal whatever it is. it has that hd video convincing you can all see each other face-to-face. you can see facial reactions to what you are presenting -- >> that's important. >> stephanie: right. >> when someone wrinkles their nose it says a lot. >> stephanie: right. it would be like oh i didn't like that one either. a was a test thing. work smarter this year, try go to meeting. click on the try it free button and
, that church would immediately declare itself the official religion of the united states of america. >> reporter: the masonic bible in a sense transcended denomination >> exactly. reporter: the story goes that washington took the oath on a random page, but vaughan thinks washington intentionally selected a passage from genesis. jacob blessing his 12 sons. where jacob blesseth his sons >> yes reporter: as a father blesses his children. where the father of our country took the oath. >> exactly. that's why it just seems to be too much you know, to be a random act >> reporter: if the bible had been randomly opened, where would it likely have been opened opened? >> here, the book of job. cheerful reading. >> reporter: yes, the book of job. you know, the one filled with disease, destruction and death. and that's not a very good foot to get off on. >> probably not. reporter: thankfully our new country fared much better and so did this bible. said to be present with washington at the ground-breaking of the u.s. capital and later at his funeral. >> in a way you could say it was on that book
. i am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. this hindu-muslim-christian- jewish-buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of saint john: "let us love one another (yes), for love is god. (yes) and every one that loveth is born of god and knoweth god. he that loveth not knoweth not god, for god is love. if we love one another, god dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us." let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. we can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. the oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. as arnold toynbee says: "love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. therefore the first hope in our
: amendment 1, congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition the government to redress of grievances. amendment 2, a well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. amendment 3, no soldier shall in time of peace be quartered at any house without the consent of the owner nor in time of war but in a manner to be prescribed by law. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from kentucky, mr. barr. mr. barr:amendment iv the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. amendment v no person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous cri
at them. it's our secular religion. that's what this day is. think of what an extraordinary moment it is. a person is a private citizen. they take that oath. they become the most powerful person in the world. they're finished. they go out. they go back out. and they're a private person again. almost no other country in the world is that possible. it's an extraordinary moment. >> i've been disappointed. a lot of people have been disappointed. if you read "the new york times" this weekend, how the president managed the office on a personal basis with members on the hill on both sides. are you hopeful that this president has learned from some of the mistakes of the first term and he's going to reach out more aggressively? even to his own party on the hill. >> well, i think he's a reflective person. he does think he's talked more than most leaders about what he did wrong the first term. that's not usual that these characters admit it and he has. i'm not sure how far he'll get reaching out to republicans. he's tried more than we know. they just didn't come sometimes. the democr
. king says, regardless of nationality, race or religion to admit our wrongs and turn from them. i believe that the denial of the right to life is the greatest injustice we face in the world today. there is no compassion in killing, she sails. there is no justice in writing people out of the human race. history, mr. speaker, will not look favorably on today's abortion culture. we must indeed and instead work tirelessly to replace it with a culture of life. i would like to now yield to my good friend and colleague, macha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. -- marsha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. mrs. blackburn: thank you, mr. speaker, and i thank the gentleman from new jersey for the excellent work that he continues to do year in and year out on this issue. i appreciate his leadership and we do stand today and mark the 40th anniversary of the tragic roe v. wade decision and it really is said that not all life is created equal. and since the supreme court gave our government's approval if you will of on-demand abortion, there have been over 55 million lives lo
, mr. yoder. mr. yoder: amendment 1, congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition the government to redress of grievances. amendment 2, a well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. amendment 3, no soldier shall in time of peace be quartered at any house without the consent of the owner nor in time of war but in a manner to be prescribed by law. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from kentucky, mr. barr. mr. barr:amendment iv the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. amendment v no person shall be held to answer for a capital, o
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)